National Association for Music Education

 

RESEARCH HAS

SHOW THAT MUSICAL STUDY HELPS TO IMPROVE:

 

  • Critical thinking and self-discipline skill.

  • A child‘s early cognitive development, basic math and reading abilities.

  • Self-esteem, SAT scores, ability to work as a team, spatial reasoning skills, and school attendance.

  • Children’s attitudes and behavior patterns, and the likelihood that a child will graduate from high school and attend college.

                   Music Education and Academic Achievement

 

  • On the 2012 SAT, students who participated in music scored an average of 31 points above average in reading, 23 points above average in math, and 31 points above average in writing.
    College Board SAT, 2012 College-Bound Seniors: Total Group Profile Report.  (See table 18.) 

  • Researchers have demonstrated a strong relationship between individuals who participated in school arts experiences and higher academic success as demonstrated by grade point averages, scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) and math and verbal portions of the SAT exam.
    Kelly, S. N.  (2012).  Fine Arts-Related Instruction’s Influence on Academic Success.

  • Students in high-quality school music programs score higher on standardized tests compared to students in schools with deficient music education programs, regardless of the socioeconomic level of the school or school district.
    Johnson, C. M. & Memmott, J. E. (2007). Examination of relationships between participation in school music programs of differing quality and standardized test results. Journal of Research in Music Education, 54(4), 293-307.

 

             Music Education and Successful Schools

 

  • Schools in Texas that have higher levels of student participation in the fine arts receive higher academic ratings and have lower drop out rates.
    Analysis conducted by the Texas Coalition for Quality Arts Education and the Texas Music Educators Association (2007) 

  • Schools that have music programs have significantly higher graduation rates than do those without music programs (90.2 percent as compared to 72.9 percent).  In addition, those that rate their programs as “excellent or very good” have an even higher graduation rate (90.9 percent).
    Harris Interactive Inc. (2006).  Understanding the Linkages Between Music Education and Educational Outcomes. 

  • Schools that have music programs have significantly higher attendance rates than do those without programs (93.3 percent as compared to 84.9 percent).
    Harris Interactive Inc. (2006).  Understanding the Linkages Between Music Education and Educational Outcomes. 

For more information, visit: www.nafme.com